Editor’s Summit 2018 Picks

By Crista Mohammed

 

 

 

To make the most of any conference set your goals and plan ahead. My picks for this year are informed by three goals:

  • Taking care of the professional me (coded blue)
  • Finding out what’s new in my field (coded pink)
  • Friending face-to-face (as opposed to virtually) (coded green)

See my plan below.

Monday 21st  May

10:30-11:20 AM  Celebration 1-2 Meet the Editors

 

Andrea Ames & Sam Dragga

The editors of Intercom magazine and Technical Communication will explain the missions of their publications, editorial processes, recent submission trends, and other topics of interest to scholars and practitioners. Participants will have the opportunity to comment and ask questions.
11:30 AM-1:00 PM
Location: TBD
Hosted by the IDL SIG IDL SIG will be meeting at a local eatery. They are providing lunch. Attendees will hear more about what the SIG has on offer, what they have accomplished, and how you can get involved.

Please confirm attendance: manager@nullstcidlsig.org

1:00-1:50 PM Celebration 9-10 Trends in Tech Comm: Tales from the Trenches

 

Sarah O’Keefe, Dawn Stevens, & Val Swisher

Three industry-leading consultants explore what’s hot; what’s not; where the industry is going; what is needed to succeed in today’s tech comm environment.

 

2:10-3:00 PM Celebration 5 What’s New in IDL?

Learning Environment Modeling Language (LEM): The New Language of Instructional Design

 

Phylise Banner

This session will introduce an easy-to-use and powerful visual learning design method called Learning Environment Modeling (LEM) — a unique visual language for enhancing communication and collaboration between instructional design professionals and diverse stakeholders.
Pub Crawl

7:30-10:30 PM

Orlando Restaurants

 

Florida Chapter

 

 

A fun night of networking, relaxing, and socializing with other 2018 STC Summit. Stay tuned for more information!!

Facebook Event

 

Tuesday  22nd  May

65th Anniversary Town Hall
10:10-11:00 AM  Celebration 1-2
Rhyne Armstrong & Julie Dwyer It’s the Summit’s 65th anniversary! This town hall session is an opportunity to tell tales, ask questions, and share ideas. The focus will be on how can individual members contribute to the future of STC and how can we innovate for the future.
1:00-1:50 PM Celebration 5 Lessons Learned: What Harry Potter’s Professors Teach us about Instructional Design

 

Jamye Sagan

Education plays a crucial role in the Harry Potter series by J.K. Rowling. Each of these professors – whether terrible or terrific –has important lessons to share regarding effective instructional design and training delivery. The presentation will profile various Hogwarts professors, and analyze the effectiveness of their lesson delivery, sharing practical tips for tackling common training issues.
2:10-3:00 PM  Celebration 1-2 Certified Professional Technical Communicator Session Q & A

 

Craig Baehr & Liz Pohland

CPTC trainers talk about the program and becoming professionally certified. These experts will answer questions on everything including study strategies, resources, continuing education, and other aspects of the program.

 

4:00-4:50 PM  Celebration 1-2 Women in Tech Comm Panel

 

Moderator: Liz Herman
Panelists: Nicky Bleiel, Alyssa Fox, Lisa Meloncon, & Tavia Record

Panelists at varying stages of their careers provide thoughtful insights around current events pertaining to women in technology and technical communication.

 

5:30-6:30 PM Windermere Ballroom

 

STC’s Annual Business Meeting Click here to view the rules for the meeting.

 

7:30-10:30 PM
Orlando Restaurants
Diner Meetup

Florida Chapter

A fun event for socializing, and networking with other 2018 STC Summit attendees in a relaxing environment while enjoying some amazing Orlando cuisine.

 

If you are interested in knowing more about this event, please mark “Interested” to follow this event page and receive updates. The Florida Chapter looks forward to seeing you there! Facebook Event

 

Wednesday  23rd  May

9:00-9:50 AM  Celebration 5 Can you hear me now? Podcasting as Teaching Tool

 

Jennifer Goode

Podcasting is one of the fastest growing areas of content production. This session will demonstrate how students can develop technical skills, increase content knowledge and understanding, and refine communication skills as they create podcasts for their course projects. It will also introduce the tools and technology necessary to set up a course podcasting project.
11:15 AM-1:00 PM

Windermere Ballroom

 

Honors Event

 

Keynote Speaker
Andy Hines

The Honors Event is the last event of the Summit. Brunch will be served. Andy Hines will wrap up what you learned about “the future of how we work, where we work, and you at work” at the Summit.

 

See you there. Safe travels everyone!!!

IDL @Summit 2018

By Viqui Dill

#STC18 IDL SIG Presentations

https://summit.stc.org/schedule/

STC IDL SIG Lunch & Annual Business Meeting

Monday, May 21, 2018 11:30 am

Location:

Celebration 4, Hyatt Orlando Hotel
9801 International Drive, Orlando, FL 32819

Register on Eventbrite

Save the date for our annual business meeting in Orlando. We will be meeting in Celebration 4 at the Hyatt and lunch will be on us! Come hear about what we offer, what we've accomplished, and how you can get involved.

Questions? Contact manager@nullstcidlsig.org

Presentations by IDL members

Sunday, 20 May

Workshop: Temperament-based Strategies for Excelling in the Workplace

Ben Woelk
1:00-4:30 PM | Celebration 7

Practitioner level audience

Temperament types have big impacts on work relationships. Today’s workplace presents challenges for both introverted and extraverted team members. Many workplaces are adopting open space layouts that foster teamwork but provide little opportunities for introverts to contribute as individuals. Extraverts may struggle with working with Introverts. Because of Western society’s emphasis on extraversion, many introverts feel unsuited or ill-equipped to thrive in today’s workplace and are not sure how to take that next step to increase influence and improve visibility. All personality types may have issues working with coworkers or management. Is your manager a Guardian, an Idealist, a Rational, or an Artisan? How does that change how you approach them? Suitable for all attendees, you’ll benefit from understanding your temperament and how you interact best with others. Attendees will benefit most from the workshop if they know their Myers-Briggs/temperament profile in advance. I recommend taking the tests at humanmetrics.com and keirsey.com before attending.

Monday, 21 May

*Yes And…: Improv’ing Your Corporate Communication Skills

Co-facilitated by Jack Molisani & Ben Woelk
Monday, 21 May | 1:00-3:00 PM EDT | Celebration 14
Tuesday, 22 May | 1:00-3:00 PM EDT | Celebration 14

Have you ever been caught off-guard by an unexpected question from your boss? Or wanted to network at a meeting but didn’t know what to say? The Alan Alda Center for Communicating Science works with scientists to help them communicate complex topics clearly and engagingly using principles from Improv (improvisational) Comedy. The facilitators will introduce you to the basics and Improv comedy, then lead you through exercises designed to improv your organizational communication skills. This session offers an exclusive interactive learning experience, and extended networking opportunity.


*This is a paid workshop session offered Monday and repeated Tuesday during the conference. Only 40 tickets ($20/person) will be sold via the Summit registration site. Please do not delay in purchasing one if you want to participate as it is likely this will sell out! Because improv must be done in small groups, we can only accommodate 20 people in the workshop on Monday, and 20 people on Tuesday. Attendees MUST purchase a ticket and bring it with them to the workshop on the day they selected.

Meet the Editors

Andrea Ames & Sam Dragga
10:30-11:20 AM | Celebration 1-2

Foundation level audience

The new editor of Intercom magazine, Andrea Ames, and the editor of Technical Communication, Sam Dragga, will host a session with conference participants and STC’s section editors and columnists. Andrea and Sam will explain the missions of their publications, editorial processes, recent submission trends, and other topics of interest for scholars and practitioners looking to publish or serve as reviewers. The aim of the session is to help prospective authors understand how to contribute to STC publications. Participants will have the opportunity to comment and ask questions of the editorial teams.

The Introvert in the Workplace: Becoming an Influencer and Leader

Ben Woelk
10:30-11:20 AM | Celebration 12-13

Foundation level audience

Many introverts struggle to succeed in the workplace when asked to “think on their feet” or to make decisions without an array of facts in hand. Much workspace design is moving to open plans, where anyone, much less introverts, may struggle with distractions and lack of privacy. Some introverts may look for leadership opportunities, but feel stymied when trying to figure out how to move up. Although not every introvert is interested in a formal leadership position (nor have the opportunity in their workplace), every introvert has the ability to become an influencer.

Join the presenter as we discuss how to identify our strengths and become influencers when we don’t have positional authority. We’ll discuss strategies that work for us and how to make sure we’re not passed over when leadership opportunities arise. We’ll also create an action plan for becoming that influencer or leader. Attendees will benefit most from the presentation if they know their Myers-Briggs/Keirsey temperament profile in advance or have used other tools such as Enneagram or Strengths Finder.

Dethrone the Content King! Culture is the True King!

Jamie Gillenwater
1:00-1:50 PM | Celebration 7-8

Practitioner level audience

In every career path, professionals help others. As a content professional, what problem do you solve? We often think content is the solution, but what is the real problem? The culture of a company influences customer, employee, and vendor relationships more than any other business asset. In this session, we will discover the relationships between the players, along with how to change your company’s culture. We will discuss the following aspects of company culture:

  • Talent acquisition
  • Talent development
  • Hidden biases
  • Leadership

We will discuss how each of these pieces fit together for success, along with tools and techniques for assessing and addressing each of these areas.

Learning Environment Modeling Language (LEM): The New Language of Instructional Design

Phylise Banner
2:10-3:00 PM | Celebration 5

Practitioner level audience

This session will introduce to an easy-to-use and powerful visual learning design method called Learning Environment Modeling (LEM) — a unique visual language created to enhance communication and foster collaboration between instructional design professionals and diverse stakeholders. During the session, participants will learn how to:

  • Visually communicate the correlation of specific design elements to learning results.
  • Use Learning Environment Modeling (LEM) to collaborate effectively with blended learning project teams and clients.
  • Facilitate more effective communication throughout the design process.
  • Use a learning environment design system and tool to remove or reduce ego-centric behaviors and attitudes during the design process. Join us to explore how LEM supports creative learning experience design and removes barriers to communication throughout the learning design process.

Managing the Team and the Project Management Panel

Moderator: Marilyn Woelk
Panelists: Todd DeLuca, Jamie Gillenwater, Jennifer Shumate, & Marilyn Woelk
3:45-4:35 PM | Celebration 1-2

Join us for a discussion on the many different aspects of management. Find inspiration and practical help for your management challenges! Learn new tips for being an effective, motivated, and successful leader! Whether you are a new manager, a manager who needs greater challenges and better results, or a professional who is thinking about becoming a manager, you will benefit from this session!

 

Tuesday, 22 May

Lessons Learned: What Harry Potter Professors Teach Us About Instructional Design

Jamye Sagan
1:00-1:50 PM | Celebration 5

Foundation level audience

 

As technical communicators, we can help communicate the future by being ready to tackle any project we receive – even ones outside our realms of expertise. For instance, our clients and employers may ask us to help develop training materials and programs, even if we have never formally studied instructional design. Education plays a crucial role in the Harry Potter series by J.K. Rowling. At Hogwarts, the school where Harry Potter and his friends study magic, we witness several examples of instruction in action. Each of these professors – whether terrible or terrific –has important lessons to share with us regarding effective instructional design and training delivery.

In this presentation, we will profile various Hogwarts professors, and analyze the effectiveness of their lesson delivery. Within the lens of each professor profile, we will share practical tips on tackling common training issues, as well as provide some real-life (aka Muggle) training examples. By the end of the presentation, you will have the necessary tools to confidently tackle many basic training requests. Even if you have neither read the Harry Potter books nor watched the movies, you can still learn something from the Hogwarts professors.

 

Lights, Camera, Action! Exploring Video Basics for Non-Production Professionals

Darcy Beery & Stacy Barton
2:10-3:00 PM | Celebration 9-10

Practitioner level audience

 

Given the choice between finding the user manual or googling a short video on YouTube, many users would prefer to both hear and see the information being presented, especially younger generations who have been raised with technology. The basic concepts of video production need no longer be shrouded in the the mysterious aura of Hollywood as consumer technology has become both cost effective and highly professional. If you or your company have been toying with the idea of producing videos for clients or customers, but have fretted about the costs or effectiveness of this method, take heart it is now easier and more anticipated than ever before.

 

Teaching Technical Writing to Engineers - What Works?

Noel Atzmiller
4:00-4:50 PM | Celebration 5

Practitioner level audience

 

This session is intended for technical communicators who have been tasked with providing technical writing training to engineers (and other highly educated, technical individuals). Attendees receive information about 10 lessons learned that they can use when developing and leading their training sessions.

 

Wednesday, 23 May

We Stoop to Conqquer: Adjusting to Mediocrity

Li-At Rathbun
10:10-11:00 AM | Celebration 5

Foundation level audience

 

When our boss or client says “good enough” work is good enough, shouldn’t it be good enough? Why is it a struggle to produce mediocre work when that’s what the customer wants? Yes, one day the powers-that-be will agree that all documentation must be flawless and superb. But how do we survive until that day comes? This session:

  • Explores reasons for why mediocre work might be okay
  • Teaches us a mantra—for those times we just need to hunker down and deliver so much less than what we’re capable of
  • Is a venting session! In our cone of silence, we will close our eyes, use anonymous names, and share our travails. We will learn we are not alone in the trenches of mediocrity!*

* No, of course you’ve never worked on a project of this sort; I’m talking to the others. You’ll just be there “to observe.”

Presentations about IDL topics

Monday, 21 May

Technological Adaptability: Formalizing a Vital Skill

Melonie McMichael
10:30-11:20 AM | Celebration 7-8

Foundation level audience

We talk about it all the time, yet we have no specific word for it. We know it is a needed and valuable skill, yet we do not teach it. We see it as part of our technology skills, yet do not recognize it as a skill on its own. What is this nebulous ability that is so important to our field yet so little quantified? Technological adaptability is the ability to learn technology quickly or deal with technology issues efficiently and with confidence. A skill in and of itself that can be learned and taught, most of us are required to demonstrate this ability to excel in our field. The goal of this session is to establish the significance and application of technological adaptability to our field, to provide our field with a common language to discuss technological adaptability, and to assisting the individual in assessing and expanding on their own adaptability skills.

 

Learning Environment Modeling Language (LEM): The New Language of Instructional Design

Phylise Banner
2:10-3:00 PM | Celebration 5

Practitioner level audience

This session will introduce to an easy-to-use and powerful visual learning design method called Learning Environment Modeling (LEM) — a unique visual language created to enhance communication and foster collaboration between instructional design professionals and diverse stakeholders. During the session, participants will learn how to:

  • Visually communicate the correlation of specific design elements to learning results.
  • Use Learning Environment Modeling (LEM) to collaborate effectively with blended learning project teams and clients.
  • Facilitate more effective communication throughout the design process.
  • Use a learning environment design system and tool to remove or reduce ego-centric behaviors and attitudes during the design process. Join us to explore how LEM supports creative learning experience design and removes barriers to communication throughout the learning design process.

 

Cognition, Usability, and Design - The Psychology of Design and Use

Kirk St.Amant
3:45-4:35 PM | Celebration 5

Practitioner level audience

 

Usable objects create and contribute value to the related organization; non-usable ones do not. Technical communicators must therefore increasingly design materials to meet the usability expectations of different audiences. They can thus benefit from approaches that help them understand and address the usability expectations of different groups. This presentation introduces technical communicators – from the novice to the experienced – to cognitive psychology models that can facilitate the design of communication products to meet the usability expectations of different audiences.

 

Attendees will learn how to:

— Use these models to do research related to the usability expectations of different audiences

— Apply the related findings to create materials that meet the usability expectations of these audiences

— Convey such research and design ideas in ways that connect to and contribute to an organization’s core practices Through using such approaches to guide and discuss their work, technical communicators can more effectively reveal the ways in which they contribute value to their organizations.

 

Tuesday, 22 May

Lessons Learned: What Harry Potter Professors Teach Us About Instructional Design

Jamye Sagan
1:00-1:50 PM | Celebration 5

Foundation level audience

 

As technical communicators, we can help communicate the future by being ready to tackle any project we receive – even ones outside our realms of expertise. For instance, our clients and employers may ask us to help develop training materials and programs, even if we have never formally studied instructional design. Education plays a crucial role in the Harry Potter series by J.K. Rowling. At Hogwarts, the school where Harry Potter and his friends study magic, we witness several examples of instruction in action. Each of these professors – whether terrible or terrific –has important lessons to share with us regarding effective instructional design and training delivery.

In this presentation, we will profile various Hogwarts professors, and analyze the effectiveness of their lesson delivery. Within the lens of each professor profile, we will share practical tips on tackling common training issues, as well as provide some real-life (aka Muggle) training examples. By the end of the presentation, you will have the necessary tools to confidently tackle many basic training requests. Even if you have neither read the Harry Potter books nor watched the movies, you can still learn something from the Hogwarts professors.

 

Lights, Camera, Action! Exploring Video Basics for Non-Production Professionals

Darcy Beery & Stacy Barton
2:10-3:00 PM | Celebration 9-10

Practitioner level audience

 

Given the choice between finding the user manual or googling a short video on YouTube, many users would prefer to both hear and see the information being presented, especially younger generations who have been raised with technology. The basic concepts of video production need no longer be shrouded in the the mysterious aura of Hollywood as consumer technology has become both cost effective and highly professional. If you or your company have been toying with the idea of producing videos for clients or customers, but have fretted about the costs or effectiveness of this method, take heart it is now easier and more anticipated than ever before.

 

Teaching Technical Writing to Engineers - What Works?

Noel Atzmiller
4:00-4:50 PM | Celebration 5

Practitioner level audience

 

This session is intended for technical communicators who have been tasked with providing technical writing training to engineers (and other highly educated, technical individuals). Attendees receive information about 10 lessons learned that they can use when developing and leading their training sessions.

 

Wednesday, 23 May

Can You Hear Me Now? Podcasting as a Teaching Tool

Jennifer Goode
9:00-9:50 AM | Celebration 5

Practitioner level audience

 

Podcasting is one of the fastest growing areas of content production today. How can technical communication instructors capitalize on this rapidly expanding technology? This session will demonstrate how students can develop technical skills, increase content knowledge and understanding, and refine communication skills as they create podcasts for their course projects. It will also introduce the tools and technology necessary to set up your own course podcasting project. Finally, the session will share instructor and student reflections from a recent course that used podcasts as a major course project.

 

Events and presentations of interest

Sunday, 20 May

Leadership Program

8:00 AM-Noon | Celebration 5-6

The Leadership Program is hosted by STC’s Community Affairs Committee (CAC). It is designed to recognize innovative communities, provide STC community leaders with training in best practices for a successful community, and enable community leaders to network with their peers from across the country. The Community Achievement Award and Pacesetter Award winners will be announced at this session.

 

Welcome Reception and Expo Hall Open

5:00-6:30 PM | Windermere Ballroom

Attend the welcome reception in the expo hall and catch up with old friends, network, and meet exhibitors. There will also be a cake cutting ceremony in honor of the 65th anniversary.

 

Monday, 21 May

Opening General Session-Opening Keynote Speaker
Carla Johnson

9:00-10:15 AM | Windermere Ballroom

Carla is a popular speaker, author, storyteller, and Chief Experience Officer for Type A Communications. Her keynote address, “Perpetual Innovation,” will talk about how the world’s most innovative teams create great ideas to deliver exponential outcomes. Don’t miss her talk during the Opening General Session on Monday morning, 21 May, at 9:00 AM.

 

Pub Crawl Event Hosted by the Florida Chapter

Florida Chapter
7:30-10:30 PM
Orlando Restaurants

Come join us for a fun night of networking, relaxing, and socializing with other 2018 STC Summit attendees. …and what better way to do all that than with a “pub crawl”

We are currently finalizing our starting points, which are located in two major gathering points on International Drive: “Pointe Orlando” and “I-Drive 360,” home to the Orlando Eye.

Pointe Orlando is within walking distance of the hotel, while I-Drive 360 is a bit further away and can be reached by car (free parking available), Uber/Lyft/Lynx, or by riding the I-Drive Trolley, which runs until 10:30PM (2 tickets to the trolley are included for those staying at the host hotel).

Stay tuned for more information!! We will be posting the pub list soon, as well as instructions on what you need to do to attend. Please note that you must be a Summit attendee to attend this event.

If you are interested in knowing more about this event, please mark “Interested” to follow this event page and receive updates. The Florida Chapter looks forward to seeing you there! https://www.facebook.com/events/927923110709784/

 

Tuesday, 22 May

65th Anniversary Town Hall Meeting

Rhyne Armstrong & Julie Dwyer
10:10-11:00 AM | Celebration 1-2

It’s the Summit’s 65th anniversary, and what have we learned over the years? …Technology moves quickly, and whether we’re writing and designing for hardware and software—or robots and AI, we technical communicators are always expanding our knowledge and resources to prepare for the future.

As we prepare for the future of STC, join our town hall session to tell tales, ask questions, and discuss constructive ideas.

How can individual members contribute to the future of STC? What lessons learned do you think everyone should know? How can we innovate for the future? Whether you’re a new or seasoned member, don’t miss this opportunity to help shape the future of your organization.

 

Certified Professional Technical Communicator (CPTC) Q&A Session

Craig Baehr & Liz Pohland
2:10-3:00 PM | Celebration 1-2

Practitioner level audience

Join CEO Liz Pohland, Chief Examiner Craig Baehr, and CPTC trainers to talk about the program and your questions about becoming professionally certified. These experts will answer questions on everything including study strategies, resources, continuing education, and other aspects of the program.

 

Annual Business Meeting

5:30-6:30 PM | Windermere Ballroom

STC’s Annual Business Meeting will be held on Tuesday, 22 May, at 5:30 PM. Plan to attend to congratulate STC’s 2018-2019 Board of Directors and incoming STC President Jane Wilson. Click here to view the rules for the meeting.

 

Diner Meetup Hosted by the Florida Chapter

Florida Chapter
7:30-10:30 PM
Orlando Restaurants

What is a “diner meetup” you might ask?

It’s a fun event that lets you meet, socialize, and network with other 2018 STC Summit attendees in a relaxing environment while enjoying some amazing Orlando cuisine.

We are currently finalizing the list of participating restaurants, which are located in two major gathering points on International Drive: Pointe Orlando and I-Drive 360, home to the Orlando Eye.

Pointe Orlando is within walking distance of the hotel, while I-Drive 360 is a bit further away and can be reached by car (free parking available), Uber/Lynx, or by riding the I-Drive Trolley, which runs until 10:30PM (2 tickets to the trolley are included for those staying at the host hotel).

Stay tuned for more information!!! We will be posting the restaurant list soon, as well as instructions on what you need to do to attend. Please note that you must be a Summit attendee to attend this event.

If you are interested in knowing more about this event, please mark “Interested” to follow this event page and receive updates. The Florida Chapter looks forward to seeing you there! https://www.facebook.com/events/235244520352265/

Wednesday, 23 May

Honors Event - Keynote Speaker

Andy Hines
11:15 AM-1:00 PM | Windermere Ballroom

The Honors Event is the last event of the Summit and will be held Wednesday, 23 May, at 11:15 AM. Brunch will be served with this event and Andy Hines will wrap up what you learned about “the future of how we work, where we work, and you at work” at the Summit. Additionally, we’ll celebrate STC’s individual award winners, as well as the Most Improved Community and Community of the Year recipients.

Book Review: The Accidental Instructional Designer

By Marcia Shannon

Cammy Bean. 2014. ASTD Press, Arlington, Virginia. [ISBN-13:978-1-56286-914-4, e-ISBN: 978-1-60728-407-9. 202 pages, including resources, bibliography, and index. US$32.95 (softcover).

Cammy Bean has written a twelve-part survey course of instructional design in one entertaining, informative, energizing book. She uses a breezy, good-humored conversational style, making this information-heavy book easier to manage. Do not expect to read this in one sitting. If you like to highlight relevant bits, every page will be day-glo’d in minutes. I took two weeks to read the book, taking time to process what I read.

This is a tour of instructional design and learning theories and their applications. The pages are thick with memorable quotes, tips about the learning and design processes, and insights into the instructional design community. The information value is high, but the text is readable, enjoyable.

The Introduction is the story of how Cammy wandered into instructional design. Having landed there, she decided to become an intentional instructional designer by researching and learning about ID. Noting that her journey was not unique, this book is her way to help other accidental instructional designers who struggle to figure out what to do next.

Part I defines instructional design. It introduces the e-learning pie (learning, creativity, technology, and business). The author discusses what design is in general and why does design matter. Part I starts the reader thinking about the ID experience, laying the groundwork for Part II.

Part II addresses the e-learning design process. Its ten chapters illustrate what works when constructing an e-course. Cammy weaves the theories and methods of learning and instruction into examples, test cases, anecdotes, making the information understandable and applicable to our own work.

Part III is a single chapter, Taking It Forward. Cammy encourages the reader to “Let this book be a gateway—a first step on your journey from an accidental instructional designer to an intentional one.” An elegant way to close the book, with advice and encouragement to the reader to find the path that fits the best.

The title prompted me to read this book. I am an accidental technical writer and occasional instructional designer myself, so I was eager to learn about someone else’s journey. My curiosity was satisfied. I felt energized to continue researching ID and finding opportunities to work in instructional design. I recommend you read this book.

Marcia Shannon, CPTC-Foundation, is an STC Senior Member, Carolina Chapter member, Secretary for the Instructional Design and eLearning and Membership Manager, Technical Editing SIGs, member of the Women in Technical Communication SIG. Her 30+ years of business experience cover IT, consumer goods, mortgage banking, and health insurance. She has written procedures, trained users, and provided user support in each field. Currently, she is on sabbatical, preparing for new adventures in writing.

O*NET Participation

The O*NET program contacted the IDL SIG to invite experienced Instructional Designers and Technologists to add their career information to the O*NET database.

Please read the invitation and consider participating in the program. If you know other instructional designers outside the IDL SIG, please share this invitation with them.

Dear Colleagues:

The O*NET Data Collection Program, which is sponsored by the U.S. Department of Labor, is seeking the input of expert Instructional Designers and Technologists.  As the nation’s most comprehensive source of occupational data, O*NET is a free resource for millions of job seekers, employers, veterans, educators, and students at www.onetonline.org.

You have the opportunity to participate in this important initiative as it will help ensure that the complexities of your profession are described accurately in the O*NET Database for the American public for career exploration and job analysis.

You are considered an Occupation Expert if you meet the following criteria:

  • At least 5 years of experience with the occupation. Includes those who are now supervising, teaching, or training IF you have at least one year of practice during your career.
  • Currently active in the occupation (practicing, supervising, teaching and/or training) and based in the U.S.

If you meet these criteria and are interested in participating as an occupation expert, please email or call Tammy Belcher at the O*NET Operations Center at RTI International (the O*NET data collection contractor) 877-233-7348 ext. 119 or tbelcher@nullonet.rti.org and provide the following:

  • Name/ # years of experience
  • Address with city and state
  • Daytime phone number
  • Email address
  • Do you have at least one year of practice in the occupation and are you still active?

Process and Participation Incentive:
A random sample of experts responding to this request will be invited to complete a set of questionnaires (paper or online versions available). $40.00 in cash and a certificate of appreciation from the U.S. Department of Labor will be included with the questionnaires.

We encourage you to consider helping to keep information about your profession accurate and current for the benefit of our colleagues and the nation. Thank you very much for your support.

The Newsletter Q3 2017 IDeaL: Design for Learning

From the Editor

By Crista Mohammed

Hello SIG members! Here’s another exciting issue of IDeaL: Design for Learning.

In this issue, we present a wide range of articles. One “cluster” (if you will) touches on hot topics in the ID field, and the second cluster treats with critical “housekeeping” ( if you will again, please pretty please) . So what’s on offer, specifically? You asked, so here’s our answer:

Viqui Dill uses an apt sports analogy to describe the trainer’s role. She convincingly argues that trainers are not coaches (aka “drill sergeants”), but cheerleaders. This article is bewitching: It is easy to read, yet treats with a complex issue in IDL--the training persona. How does the trainer locate him or herself in relation to participants? How does the trainer construct an identity that is supportive of learning? Read more…

Phil Havlik reduces his training evaluation to four critical questions. This is quite an achievement, let me tell you, as sometimes the evaluation form is harder to complete than the training! In devising our evaluations, Phil advises us to bear in mind that participants want to complete their evaluations quickly and that trainers need detailed feedback: These seemingly competing demands can be met with a few, well-placed questions. Read more

David Dick tackles a problem that is endemic to all modern enterprise: If your business uses ICTs, then legacy systems are a huge problem (and headache). David’s article prompts us to carefully think through and plan for technology migrations. For example, is there need for training of newer staff in legacy systems so that there is continuity? Read more...

Allie Proff chronicles her personal journey from never having attended a conference to becoming a regular presenter at the STC Summit. Allie’s sharing of her personal doubts is courageous and frank. She ends with sensible advice on how to overcome that anxiety. Her most powerful argument? We all can bring value to our community through presenting our work: What stands in the way is our self-doubt. But you can conquer those fears, like Allie, and when you do, you will find the experience affirming. Read more...

Marcia Shannon encourages us to become Certified Professional Technical Communicators. This is another courageous bit of sharing. Examining her decision to seek certification, Marcia reveals that the decision was both deeply personal and professional. Marcia provides solid advice on how you too can earn your Professional Technical Communicator certification. Congratulations to Marcia on becoming a CPTC. Read more…

Viqui Dill in her co-manager’s column reports on the the last quarter. Lot’s have been going on and the SIG will be delivering lot’s more in the final quarter (can you believe it?) of 2017. Don’t miss out. Read more…

Lori Meyer recently renewed her STC membership for the 33rd time. We join Lori in celebrating this AMAZING milestone. In her co-manager’s column, it is clear why Lori has been a member for so long: She finds great value in her membership. She has built a network of STC friends that has been supportive of her career and you can too. Read more...

Marcia Shannon in her Secretary’s column continues where Lori left off. She adds to the long list of benefits that STC and IDL SIG members reap. For additional, compelling reasons to join or stay with us, read more…

Sylvia Miller issues another call for student essays. Yep, our first student outreach essay competition was a resounding success! We attracted and published several student articles, and our SIG earned the STC 2017 Pacesetter for this initiative!  Read more...

 

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