List of Degree or Certificate Programs in Instructional Design

By Sylvia Miller

Are you or a colleague contemplating a degree or certificate program in instructional design? If so, you should check out our webpage that provides a long list of such programs. Each program is linked directly to the institution’s website which contains details about the program. You’ll find a variety of titles for these programs, including educational technology, instructional technology, instructional systems technology, instructional design, and more. You’ll also find that some institutions offer online-only programs, while others provide only in-person degree or certificate programs, or a mixture of the two.

Sure, you could just search the web for “instructional design,” but your search results will include descriptions of universities that offer instructional design services for professors and staff who do not develop or maintain their own online courses. So, we hope you’ll check out our Education page at http://www.stcidlsig.org/education/. And if you know of an institution that should be added to the list, please email me at sylviaamiller@nullwoh.rr.com with the name of the institution and, if possible, a link to the webpage describing the program. Also notify me if you find a broken link. Meanwhile, enjoy!

Book Review: Charles Ess – Digital Media Ethics

Reviewed by Elizabeth Patterson

In Digital Media Ethics, Charles Ess explores the ethical issues encountered in digital media from a global perspective. Ess focuses on issues and legal regulations within the US, EU, and Asia. Some of the main topics covered in the book include privacy, copyright, citizen journalism, and general digital media ethics. Ess goes into great detail about each topic, and includes case studies and discussion questions within each chapter of the book. The layout and structure of the book are perfect for students and classroom settings.

One of the strongest qualities of this book is the detail throughout. Each topic is explored thoroughly, and includes related case studies and discussion questions to allow the reader to contemplate the content on an even deeper level. In addition, Ess does an excellent job of helping the reader to understand data mining and ways in which privacy can be maintained while using digital media by exploring relevant cases that have taken place in the US, EU, and Asia.

Ess also does an excellent job of exploring the ethics behind copying and distributing property through digital media. With the increasing amount of information available online, “the general rules, guidelines, and laws applicable to such copying are wide-ranging and frequently shifting” (p. 91). This can make it difficult to truly understand the ethical and legal ways to access and use property. Ess helps explain this by explaining FLOSS (Free/Libre/Open Source Software) and the Creative Commons approach. While some of these concepts can be challenging to understand, Ess does a commendable job of pulling content from websites and licenses while supplementing with his own explanation.

While Digital Media Ethics contains many strengths, the content is somewhat dense in some places. The discussion questions throughout and at the end of the chapters are helpful in examining certain concepts on a deeper level, as well as breaking up the text. While Ess does a great job of explaining certain topics such as copying and distributing property, some sections of the text are overwhelming and difficult to follow. For example, one chapter focuses on privacy in the electronic global metropolis. While this chapter contains valuable information and relevant case studies, it is easy to get lost in some of the extensive descriptions and concepts, which are arguably over-explained.

As mentioned before, because of the discussion questions that are used to break up this book, it would be a good choice for school and university courses that emphasize digital media and information ethics as seen throughout the world. This book could work for undergraduate discussion-based courses, but because of the complexity of some of the concepts, graduate and doctoral courses would especially benefit from this book, particularly courses that are seminar based.

Outside of a university setting, Digital Media Ethics has relevance to just about any profession. Documentation managers, who are in charge of managing both the creation and maintenance of documentation within their organizations, would find this text especially useful. Many of the resources used today to assist in research and writing are online. While the book is somewhat dense, Ess does an excellent job of explaining the most relevant ethical issues in digital media today. Documentation managers would be able to relate to some of the cases discussed within the book, as well as benefit from the explanations and resources provided in the chapter, “Copying and Distributing via Digital Media.”

As a high school teacher, I am constantly looking for ways that I can teach my students about the importance of digital media ethics and online privacy and safety. While Digital Media Ethics is a much higher-level book, it includes topics and case studies relevant for high school students. Ess argues that, “it becomes increasingly essential, for example, for young people to participate in social networking sites – failure to do so threatens to isolate them from the large majority of their peers who are active on such sites” (p. 121). This claim demonstrates the popularity of social media, and therefore the importance of understanding how to navigate the sites ethically and safely. Safe internet use is a growing need among high school students and Ess does a good job of beginning to discuss this, as well as including some thought-provoking discussion questions that would benefit students of all ages.

Digital Media Ethics is an interesting read that focuses on ethical scenarios encountered online on a daily basis. While the book is relevant to today’s society, it is not a light read and does require some deep thought and consideration that would be great for university teachers and students to utilize within an ethics course. The chapters are packed full with case studies that would also greatly benefit technical writers, documentation managers, and those who work with and use online content frequently.

November 13, 2017 IDL SIG Virtual Open House

Join the IDL SIG online for our Virtual Open House!

4:30 pm Pacific / 5:30 pm Mountain / 6:30 pm Central / 7:30 pm Eastern

Monday, November 13, 2017

 

Register on Eventbrite
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As a virtual community, with all of our members scattered across the globe, we do not have the same opportunities as geographically-based communities to meet up face-to-face. Since 2013, we have hosted the IDL SIG Virtual Open House (VOH) so that new and prospective IDL SIG members could learn more about our community’s mission and goals, learn more about member benefits, and meet some of our leaders and volunteers.

During our VOH, participants have always had the opportunity to ask questions about the SIG and what we offer.

Virtual Party, too!

We’d like to combine our VOH with a virtual party (VP), where we would encourage all attendees to share a photo or story. The VP (not be confused with Vice President!) we hope will add a very human, personal side to our VOH. Hey, it is all about making real, enduring connections!

About the webinar

The webinar will be recorded so feel free to watch with us online and then rewatch at your leisure. No need to take notes. If you cannot attend, sign up anyway so that you will get a link to the recording.

See the 2016 VOH recording on YouTube.

See the 2015 VOH recording on YouTube.

See the 2014 VOH recording on Adobe Connect.

 

Register on Eventbrite
eventbrite-142

IDL SIG Virtual Open House November 16, 2016

IDL SIG Open House Nov 10, 2015

NEWS: Students attend our webinars for free

Attention students and academic professionals!

The STC Instructional Design and Learning Special Interest Group proudly announces a new benefit for students who want to explore the world of technical instruction in electronic and traditional classroom settings.

Students can now attend our webinars for free.

Yep, that's right. Students and academic professionals can now attend our webinars for free.

How do I qualify?

Students who register with a *.edu email address can attend for free. Explorers are welcome. You do not need to be enrolled in a tech comm or IDL program. As long as you're a student and you're curious, you are invited to join us.

Academic professionals, we want you, too. Whether you're a professor, instructor, advisor, or campus butcher, baker, or candlestick maker, you are in touch with students exploring what they want to become. We want you to feel free to register for our webinars so that you can have answers when they have questions.

How do I register?

Register on Eventbrite and choose the free Students and academics ticket. All your registration information, as well as the link to the webinar before the session, will be sent to your *.edu email address.

Check out two of our upcoming webinars and register today.

August 16, 2017 “Digital Citizenship in an Online World” webinar with Phil Havlik

September 21, 2017 “Create Presentation Handouts That People Will Actually Use” webinar with Chuck Campbell

Why are you doing this?

The SIG strives to promote sound design practices, provide information, and educate about instructional theory and research. We accomplish this mission by building internal and external partnerships, and by having activities that increase awareness about our field.

See our complete mission statement on our About page and join us online in our LinkedIn group, our Facebook page, and on Twitter.

If you have more questions, contact our co-managers Viqui and Lori at manager@nullstcidlsig.org.

November 16, 2016 IDL SIG Virtual Open House

Join the IDL SIG online for our Virtual Open House!

5 pm Pacific / 6 pm Mountain / 7:00 pm Central / 8:00 pm Eastern

Wed, November 16, 2016

Watch the recording at http://stc.adobeconnect.com/p70g5iisf77/

See the slides below or download the slides as pdf here or as a PowerPoint here.

Register on Eventbrite
eventbrite-142

As a virtual community, with all of our members scattered across the globe, we do not have the same opportunities as geographically-based communities to meet up face-to-face. Since 2013, we have hosted the IDL SIG Virtual Open House (VOH) so that new and prospective IDL SIG members could learn more about our community’s mission and goals, learn more about member benefits, and meet some of our leaders and volunteers.

During our VOH, participants have always had the opportunity to ask questions about the SIG and what we offer.

Virtual Party, too!

This year, we’d like to try something new. We’d like to combine our VOH with a virtual party (VP), where we would encourage all attendees to share a photo or story. The VP (not be confused with Vice President!) we hope will add a very human, personal side to our VOH. Hey, it is all about making real, enduring connections!

About the webinar

The webinar will be recorded so feel free to watch with us online and then rewatch at your leisure. No need to take notes. If you cannot attend, sign up anyway so that you will get a link to the recording.

See the 2015 VOH recording and slides on our website.

See the 2014 VOH recording on Adobe Connect.

Register on Eventbrite
eventbrite-142