IDL SIG Business Meeting May 21, 2018

Hey everyone who attended our business meeting at the #STC18 Summit. We're so glad you joined us.

Slides are available in a number of formats:

We also have pdf versions of the other handouts:

Join our SIG for just $10 by sending an email to Erin Gallilee  membership@nullstc.org. We would love to have you aboard!

And if you haven't yet, could you please take a minute to tell us how we did? We have a short survey with 8 easy questions.

https://goo.gl/forms/2VAjPE0aHYTGH8lR2

Thanks again for joining us. Don't be shy about contacting us with any questions, suggestions, feedback, or just to say "Hi."

Your IDL SIG volunteers, Viqui, Lori, Mellissa, Jamye, and Crista

manager@nullstcidlsig.org

IDL SIG Honest-to-Goodness Face-to-Face Biz Mtg & Lunch Buffet

Register on Eventbrite

DESCRIPTION

The Instructional Design and Learning SIG is holding its annual business meeting on Monday, May 21, 11:30 AM to 1:00 PM.

Come hear about what we offer our members, what we've accomplished during the past year, and learn how you can get involved. Get the most out of your STC membership: meet fellow SIG members face-to-face. Wondering how a SIG works, why people belong to them? Come check us out!

Location:

Celebration 4, Hyatt Orlando Hotel
9801 International Drive, Orlando, FL 32819

Time:

11:30 AM - 1:00 PM EDT

Cost:

Free (but you must pre-register as we need firm numbers on May 19)

Menu:

  • Cream of tomato and basil soup, oyster crackers, shaved parmesan
  • Build your own salad bar to include: sliced grilled chicken, chopped egg, kidney beans, and diced ham, mixed field greens, cherry tomatoes, cucumbers, red onions, carrots and peppers, chef's selection of dressings
  • Freshly baked rolls
  • Assorted cookies
  • Fudge brownies
  • Freshly brewed iced tea

Come join us for soup, salad, and schmoozing at our honest-to-goodness face-to-face business meeting and lunch buffet!

Register on Eventbrite

You're personally invited!

Usability Standards for eLearning, Distributed Learning, or Websites

By Maria Peter

Have your ever felt that an eLearning course or a website is difficult to use and quit trying as it is time consuming and not serving its purpose? For any eLearning course, distributed learning material, or website usability determines its success.

Issa et al. defines ‘Usability is the ease of use and learnability of a human-made object such as a tool or device.’ Usability can be measured by the quality of users’ experiences. The quality is determined by the effectiveness/ease of use, efficiency/less time to accomplish, and the overall satisfaction level of the users. Multiple properties are combined during the design and development stages to increase usability standards. The key properties recommended by the U.S. Department of Health & Human Services are:

  • Intuitive Design Layout: When users can effortlessly navigate to accomplish their tasks.
  • Efficiency of Use: When experienced users can accomplish their tasks quickly.
  • Easy to Observe and Use: When new users can accomplish their tasks with ease.
  • Easy to Recall: When users can remember actions to use in their future visits.
  • Fewer Errors and Reduced Severity: When errors are less frequent and less serious.
  • Increased Satisfaction: When users feel happy to visit the website again.

Why Following Usability Standards is Essential

Usability standards serve as guidelines during the design and development phases of eLearning courses, distributed learning materials, or websites that are meant to serve a wide range of audience profile.

Usability Standards for eLearning Courses or Distributed Learning Materials

Usability is the core of eLearning courses and it determines the satisfaction level of users. Essentially, it enables learners to achieve their objectives successfully. Most of the eLearning courses have a Help file to help new learners to understand the purpose of various user interface buttons, title bar area, content area, and others, see Image 1.

Image 1: An eLearning Course − User Interface

Here are some key usability standards that are based on Nielson’s 10 usability heuristics and Hetsevich’s adaptation of the heuristics to improvise eLearning courseware design:

  • User Interface Buttons: Include clearly defined navigational buttons such as Previous, Next, Play, Pause, Rewind, Audio mute/unmute, Exit, etc. to enhance learners’ experiences
  • Learning Path: Ensure the structure of the course or the logical learning path is streamlined, for example: Course > Topic > Pages.

Consistency and Standards ensure uniformity in page layout, graphics style, fonts style, color theme, etc., across a course so the users will not be distracted by variations. To enhance learners’ experiences, use suitable font type, style, and size. Here are some thoughts on key  design principles:

  • Information Recall: Ensure all primary information are displayed on the screen always and the representation of the secondary information such as Trivia, Did You Know, etc. are standardized across a course.
  • Flexibility and Efficiency of Use: Include different learning paths as per audience profile – experienced and novice. For example, pre-assessment can be used to help novices understand the knowledge gap and experts to confirm their knowledge level and move on to the next level.
  • Focussed Approach: Ensure you have a defined objective for every page to avoid irrelevant information.
  • Feedback: Provide feedback to help learners understand the reason for an error that may have occurred. For example, if a learner’s response is incorrect for a knowledge check question provide descriptive feedback that suggests the required changes.
  • Content Development: Create compelling, meaningful, cohesive, engaging, and sustainable content that enables learners to attain the expected goal.
  • Graphics: Use graphics to complement content and help learners to grasp content quickly.
  • Transcript and Caption: Provide full transcript and caption when audio narration is used.
  • Autonomy: Ensure that users have control over videos play, pause, and mute function.

Usability Standards for Websites

There are many factors that contribute to the success of a website. For instance, in a website, the layout, and architecture should be easy to understand and use, navigational elements should be obvious and easy to follow, and homepage should clearly state its purpose and how it will benefit the user, see Image 2.

Image 2: An eCommerce Website − User Interface

To retain users on websites, we can apply several usability standards. The U.S. Department of Health & Human Services has conducted extensive research on web design and provides elaborate usability guidelines. Now, let’s take a look at some of the key guidelines that you can follow when creating a website:

Goals

  • Define and document the primary goals before initiating the design and development process.
  • Set performance goals to identify success rates and the time it takes to find specific information.

Visual Design and Development

  • Use personas to help design team focused on the requirements.
  • Ensure visual consistency of the website elements such as company logo, graphics, titles, clickables, etc.
  • Design for monitors with the screen resolution set at 1024x768 pixels and test for the most common browsers and operating systems.

Navigation/Interaction

  • Clearly differentiate navigational elements.
  • Use breadcrumb or other means to help users know their location.
  • Avoid horizontal scroll bars.
  • Use color changes to indicate visited and unvisited links.

Content

  • Do not require users to enter the same information more than once.
  • Do not require users to remember information from place to place on a website.

Assistive Technology

  • Ensure the website supports assistive technologies so people with disabilities can use it effectively − Section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act.

Search Engine Optimization

  • Ensure the website is optimized to appear in the first page of all major search engines’ result pages.

Final Words

Give your users what they want to see and know. Empower them to accomplish their tasks efficiently, effectively, and satisfactorily. You can visit different eLearning courses or websites and analyze them based on the standards outlined above. When designing and developing an eLearning course or a website, this experience will direct you appropriately.

References

Hetsevich, Ilona. 2014. “How to Improve eLearning Course Design Usability By Adopting The 10 Usability Heuristics.” https://elearningindustry.com/how-to-improve-elearning-course-design-usability-by-adopting-the-10-usability-heuristics.

Issa, Tomayess, Kommers, Piet, Issa, Theodora, Isaías, Pedro, and Issa, Touma B eds. March 2017. Smart Technology Applications in Business Environments. Pennsylvania, USA: IGI Global. https://books.google.co.in/books?id=sD5IDgAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover#v=onepage&q&f=false.

Nielsen, Jakob.1995. “Usability Heuristics for User Interface Design.” https://www.nngroup.com/articles/ten-usability-heuristics/?utm_campaign=elearningindustry.com&utm_source=%2Fhow-to-improve-elearning-course-design-usability-by-adopting-the-10-usability-heuristics&utm_medium=link.

Nielsen, Jakob. January4, 2012. “Usability 101: Introduction to Usability.”https://www.nngroup.com/articles/usability-101-introduction-to-usability/.

Usability.gov. “Research-Based Web Design & Usability Guidelines.” Accessed January 17, 2018. https://www.usability.gov/sites/default/files/documents/guidelines_book.pdf.

Usability.gov. “Usability Evaluation Basics.” Accessed January 12, 2018. https://www.usability.gov/what-and-why/usability-evaluation.html.

Suggested Reading

10 Usability Heuristics for User Interface Design: https://www.nngroup.com/articles/ten-usability-heuristics/?utm_campaign=elearningindustry.com&utm_source=%2Fhow-to-improve-elearning-course-design-usability-by-adopting-the-10-usability-heuristics&utm_medium=link

Research – Based Web Design & Usability Guidelines: https://www.usability.gov/sites/default/files/documents/guidelines_book.pdf

Maria Peter has been an Instructional Designer for almost a decade. She likes conceptualizing learning solutions using scenarios, case studies, stories, serious games, etc. She recently completed her studies in Technical Communication at Seneca, where she had ample opportunity to acquire hands-on experience. Lately, she has been writing about the use of virtual reality, augmented reality and serious games in learning. She was awarded “You've Earned It Award" at Fidelity Investments for handling multiple eLearning projects and training writers who aspired to be instructional designers.

Meet an IDLer: Viqui Dill*

By Viqui Dill and Sara Buchanan

Buckle in, you're about to learn about the wonderfully talented, funny, and experienced Viqui Dill. She has taken the time to give me a wonderfully detailed and honest interview about her life and experiences as a woman in the workforce and active member of STC.

Viqui has been an STC member since 2007 when she was newly hired at American Woodmark. She shares, "my coworker, Nancy Mule' very enthusiastically recommended the society and mentored me through the registration process. My first community affiliation was with the Washington, DC – Baltimore chapter. I remember how nervous I was when I attended my first event. But I ran into Carolyn Klinger by chance in the women's room and she put me instantly at ease. She introduced me to Annette Reilly who was the speaker for the day. I also met Helen Sydavar and we exchanged business cards. From that meeting on, I have looked forward to our face-to-face meetings and try to be more like Carolyn and put new attendees at ease."

STC Baltimore Chapter members Carolyn Klinger, Greta Buskirk, and Viqui Dill at STC17.

Currently, Viqui serves as a co-manager for the Instructional Design & Learning (IDL) Special Interest Group (SIG). Her journey with the IDL SIG started in 2012 when her and Robert Hershenow were both members of the Rough Drafts band and presenters in the instructional design progression session. Robert invited her to the SIG based on the content of her presentation and explained that they were looking for someone to take over the webinar programs. Viqui shares, "Robert was co-managing with Mellissa Ruryk and I loved their leadership style, empowering volunteers to do whatever best used their strengths. I love putting on the webinars because it's a platform for showing off the great rock stars of our field and sharing great information with the community. I always learn something and I get a chance to get to know the presenters in the process."

 

IDL SIG Receiving the Platinum STC Community Award at STC17

Viqui is "a bad ass bass player. Bass is the most bad ass of all instruments." She played at #STC17 with the Rough Drafts! She even shared proof:

 

The Rough Drafts at STC17
Viqui Playing Bass for The Rough Drafts

Viqui works at American Woodmark as a Technical Communication Leader supporting infrastructure projects that touch all the employees at the company. She reports directly to the CIO and "works with and learns from some of the smartest, sharpest folks from all across the company, from Sacramento to Orlando." She continues, "I have the best job ever. My company has an annual President’s Award for projects that have a big impact on the way we do business. I’ve worked on two winning teams that were recognized by the company president, one for Quality, and another for our builder service centers. It’s great to be a part of a winning team and even better when the team gets recognized by the president. Also, my company has a very strong culture of caring. We have a number of committees that ensure we walk the talk. I am a member of a team that sets up monthly lunch and learn sessions that give employees an opportunity to tell their own personal and professional stories. The speakers are so candid and the sessions are so heart-warming that I love working on this team."

Viqui took her first tech writer job at BMC software. She was working as a software developer and wasn't enjoying it when her friend, Mary Boyd, invited her to apply to a tech writer job. Viqui shares, "I loved the work immediately and enjoyed staying in the technical world without having to write the code. I'm an extrovert and the additional opportunities for human interaction were a good fit."

Her journey includes a BS from Virginia Tech in Industrial Engineering and Operations Research where she learned to think analytically and pull apart problems into manageable pieces. Her education continues through her work with STC where, according to her, "I learn something from y’all most every day. We have our Summits and regional conferences (I’m going to Interchange and Conduit this year). We have webinars. We have social media. You teach me leadership skills, project management, learning theory, practical hands-on tips, and tool mastery. You pretty much mentor me through the whole tech comm process." American Wookmark, her workplace, recognizes the value of her STC membership and involvement as the best way to develop and sustain her job skills. She continues, "I am lucky to work for a company that supports my professional development by covering my membership, event attendance, and some of my volunteer time."

Viqui told me that if she could give advice to herself she wouldn't "take things so seriously. My biggest mistakes have been made when I was thinking that something was a big deal when it really wasn’t."

I asked Viqui how the Tech Comm industry has changed throughout her career to which she responded, "We have gotten lighter, tighter, and much much faster. We no longer produce paper manuals so there’s an expectation of getting a quick turnaround on projects that didn’t use to happen. And crowdsourcing is possible because we can get our user communities involved. And because we have our online tech comm communities, I have so many more resources available to me. I think y’all have made me smarter every year as I hang out in the online #TechComm world."

She shares the struggles she's experienced as a leader,"Leading volunteers is tricky. You’ve got to be willing to be the one who does jobs nobody else wants to do. You’ve got to love love love the folks who are willing to walk with you. That’s why STC is so great. We have great leaders and they set a great example for the rest of us to follow. Servant leadership works every time." I work with her in the IDL SIG and I can attest to her wonderful leadership and true appreciation for the work everyone does.

Viqui further shares her experiences as a woman in the workforce, "So one of the reasons I love tech comm over programming and engineering is because we’re female friendly. When I’m struggling to earn the respect of a colleague at work, I try to keep in mind the overwhelming respect I receive in STC and also here at work from my supportive management. We do eventually win people over and having the support is so important. We’ve come a long way (baby). Read this blog post about my own personal harassment story that happened back in 1978."

When asked about how she maintains work/life balance, Viqui shares, "I’m an energetic empty nester. I raised my son and I raised my husband and now it’s time to raise myself. I say “yes” a lot. Volunteering is fun and energizing. Plus, I get to work with a lot of smart and talented people as I volunteer." And, my personal favorite, "I only wear comfortable shoes."

Thank you Viqui!

 

*This article was first published by Northeast Ohio Society for Technical Communication. See: http://neostc.org/cmswp/in-the-spotlight-viqui-dill/

IDL @Summit 2018

By Viqui Dill

#STC18 IDL SIG Presentations

https://summit.stc.org/schedule/

STC IDL SIG Lunch & Annual Business Meeting

Monday, May 21, 2018 11:30 am

Location:

Celebration 4, Hyatt Orlando Hotel
9801 International Drive, Orlando, FL 32819

Register on Eventbrite

Save the date for our annual business meeting in Orlando. We will be meeting in Celebration 4 at the Hyatt and lunch will be on us! Come hear about what we offer, what we've accomplished, and how you can get involved.

Questions? Contact manager@nullstcidlsig.org

Presentations by IDL members

Sunday, 20 May

Workshop: Temperament-based Strategies for Excelling in the Workplace

Ben Woelk
1:00-4:30 PM | Celebration 7

Practitioner level audience

Temperament types have big impacts on work relationships. Today’s workplace presents challenges for both introverted and extraverted team members. Many workplaces are adopting open space layouts that foster teamwork but provide little opportunities for introverts to contribute as individuals. Extraverts may struggle with working with Introverts. Because of Western society’s emphasis on extraversion, many introverts feel unsuited or ill-equipped to thrive in today’s workplace and are not sure how to take that next step to increase influence and improve visibility. All personality types may have issues working with coworkers or management. Is your manager a Guardian, an Idealist, a Rational, or an Artisan? How does that change how you approach them? Suitable for all attendees, you’ll benefit from understanding your temperament and how you interact best with others. Attendees will benefit most from the workshop if they know their Myers-Briggs/temperament profile in advance. I recommend taking the tests at humanmetrics.com and keirsey.com before attending.

Monday, 21 May

*Yes And…: Improv’ing Your Corporate Communication Skills

Co-facilitated by Jack Molisani & Ben Woelk
Monday, 21 May | 1:00-3:00 PM EDT | Celebration 14
Tuesday, 22 May | 1:00-3:00 PM EDT | Celebration 14

Have you ever been caught off-guard by an unexpected question from your boss? Or wanted to network at a meeting but didn’t know what to say? The Alan Alda Center for Communicating Science works with scientists to help them communicate complex topics clearly and engagingly using principles from Improv (improvisational) Comedy. The facilitators will introduce you to the basics and Improv comedy, then lead you through exercises designed to improv your organizational communication skills. This session offers an exclusive interactive learning experience, and extended networking opportunity.


*This is a paid workshop session offered Monday and repeated Tuesday during the conference. Only 40 tickets ($20/person) will be sold via the Summit registration site. Please do not delay in purchasing one if you want to participate as it is likely this will sell out! Because improv must be done in small groups, we can only accommodate 20 people in the workshop on Monday, and 20 people on Tuesday. Attendees MUST purchase a ticket and bring it with them to the workshop on the day they selected.

Meet the Editors

Andrea Ames & Sam Dragga
10:30-11:20 AM | Celebration 1-2

Foundation level audience

The new editor of Intercom magazine, Andrea Ames, and the editor of Technical Communication, Sam Dragga, will host a session with conference participants and STC’s section editors and columnists. Andrea and Sam will explain the missions of their publications, editorial processes, recent submission trends, and other topics of interest for scholars and practitioners looking to publish or serve as reviewers. The aim of the session is to help prospective authors understand how to contribute to STC publications. Participants will have the opportunity to comment and ask questions of the editorial teams.

The Introvert in the Workplace: Becoming an Influencer and Leader

Ben Woelk
10:30-11:20 AM | Celebration 12-13

Foundation level audience

Many introverts struggle to succeed in the workplace when asked to “think on their feet” or to make decisions without an array of facts in hand. Much workspace design is moving to open plans, where anyone, much less introverts, may struggle with distractions and lack of privacy. Some introverts may look for leadership opportunities, but feel stymied when trying to figure out how to move up. Although not every introvert is interested in a formal leadership position (nor have the opportunity in their workplace), every introvert has the ability to become an influencer.

Join the presenter as we discuss how to identify our strengths and become influencers when we don’t have positional authority. We’ll discuss strategies that work for us and how to make sure we’re not passed over when leadership opportunities arise. We’ll also create an action plan for becoming that influencer or leader. Attendees will benefit most from the presentation if they know their Myers-Briggs/Keirsey temperament profile in advance or have used other tools such as Enneagram or Strengths Finder.

Dethrone the Content King! Culture is the True King!

Jamie Gillenwater
1:00-1:50 PM | Celebration 7-8

Practitioner level audience

In every career path, professionals help others. As a content professional, what problem do you solve? We often think content is the solution, but what is the real problem? The culture of a company influences customer, employee, and vendor relationships more than any other business asset. In this session, we will discover the relationships between the players, along with how to change your company’s culture. We will discuss the following aspects of company culture:

  • Talent acquisition
  • Talent development
  • Hidden biases
  • Leadership

We will discuss how each of these pieces fit together for success, along with tools and techniques for assessing and addressing each of these areas.

Learning Environment Modeling Language (LEM): The New Language of Instructional Design

Phylise Banner
2:10-3:00 PM | Celebration 5

Practitioner level audience

This session will introduce to an easy-to-use and powerful visual learning design method called Learning Environment Modeling (LEM) — a unique visual language created to enhance communication and foster collaboration between instructional design professionals and diverse stakeholders. During the session, participants will learn how to:

  • Visually communicate the correlation of specific design elements to learning results.
  • Use Learning Environment Modeling (LEM) to collaborate effectively with blended learning project teams and clients.
  • Facilitate more effective communication throughout the design process.
  • Use a learning environment design system and tool to remove or reduce ego-centric behaviors and attitudes during the design process. Join us to explore how LEM supports creative learning experience design and removes barriers to communication throughout the learning design process.

Managing the Team and the Project Management Panel

Moderator: Marilyn Woelk
Panelists: Todd DeLuca, Jamie Gillenwater, Jennifer Shumate, & Marilyn Woelk
3:45-4:35 PM | Celebration 1-2

Join us for a discussion on the many different aspects of management. Find inspiration and practical help for your management challenges! Learn new tips for being an effective, motivated, and successful leader! Whether you are a new manager, a manager who needs greater challenges and better results, or a professional who is thinking about becoming a manager, you will benefit from this session!

 

Tuesday, 22 May

Lessons Learned: What Harry Potter Professors Teach Us About Instructional Design

Jamye Sagan
1:00-1:50 PM | Celebration 5

Foundation level audience

 

As technical communicators, we can help communicate the future by being ready to tackle any project we receive – even ones outside our realms of expertise. For instance, our clients and employers may ask us to help develop training materials and programs, even if we have never formally studied instructional design. Education plays a crucial role in the Harry Potter series by J.K. Rowling. At Hogwarts, the school where Harry Potter and his friends study magic, we witness several examples of instruction in action. Each of these professors – whether terrible or terrific –has important lessons to share with us regarding effective instructional design and training delivery.

In this presentation, we will profile various Hogwarts professors, and analyze the effectiveness of their lesson delivery. Within the lens of each professor profile, we will share practical tips on tackling common training issues, as well as provide some real-life (aka Muggle) training examples. By the end of the presentation, you will have the necessary tools to confidently tackle many basic training requests. Even if you have neither read the Harry Potter books nor watched the movies, you can still learn something from the Hogwarts professors.

 

Lights, Camera, Action! Exploring Video Basics for Non-Production Professionals

Darcy Beery & Stacy Barton
2:10-3:00 PM | Celebration 9-10

Practitioner level audience

 

Given the choice between finding the user manual or googling a short video on YouTube, many users would prefer to both hear and see the information being presented, especially younger generations who have been raised with technology. The basic concepts of video production need no longer be shrouded in the the mysterious aura of Hollywood as consumer technology has become both cost effective and highly professional. If you or your company have been toying with the idea of producing videos for clients or customers, but have fretted about the costs or effectiveness of this method, take heart it is now easier and more anticipated than ever before.

 

Teaching Technical Writing to Engineers - What Works?

Noel Atzmiller
4:00-4:50 PM | Celebration 5

Practitioner level audience

 

This session is intended for technical communicators who have been tasked with providing technical writing training to engineers (and other highly educated, technical individuals). Attendees receive information about 10 lessons learned that they can use when developing and leading their training sessions.

 

Wednesday, 23 May

We Stoop to Conqquer: Adjusting to Mediocrity

Li-At Rathbun
10:10-11:00 AM | Celebration 5

Foundation level audience

 

When our boss or client says “good enough” work is good enough, shouldn’t it be good enough? Why is it a struggle to produce mediocre work when that’s what the customer wants? Yes, one day the powers-that-be will agree that all documentation must be flawless and superb. But how do we survive until that day comes? This session:

  • Explores reasons for why mediocre work might be okay
  • Teaches us a mantra—for those times we just need to hunker down and deliver so much less than what we’re capable of
  • Is a venting session! In our cone of silence, we will close our eyes, use anonymous names, and share our travails. We will learn we are not alone in the trenches of mediocrity!*

* No, of course you’ve never worked on a project of this sort; I’m talking to the others. You’ll just be there “to observe.”

Presentations about IDL topics

Monday, 21 May

Technological Adaptability: Formalizing a Vital Skill

Melonie McMichael
10:30-11:20 AM | Celebration 7-8

Foundation level audience

We talk about it all the time, yet we have no specific word for it. We know it is a needed and valuable skill, yet we do not teach it. We see it as part of our technology skills, yet do not recognize it as a skill on its own. What is this nebulous ability that is so important to our field yet so little quantified? Technological adaptability is the ability to learn technology quickly or deal with technology issues efficiently and with confidence. A skill in and of itself that can be learned and taught, most of us are required to demonstrate this ability to excel in our field. The goal of this session is to establish the significance and application of technological adaptability to our field, to provide our field with a common language to discuss technological adaptability, and to assisting the individual in assessing and expanding on their own adaptability skills.

 

Learning Environment Modeling Language (LEM): The New Language of Instructional Design

Phylise Banner
2:10-3:00 PM | Celebration 5

Practitioner level audience

This session will introduce to an easy-to-use and powerful visual learning design method called Learning Environment Modeling (LEM) — a unique visual language created to enhance communication and foster collaboration between instructional design professionals and diverse stakeholders. During the session, participants will learn how to:

  • Visually communicate the correlation of specific design elements to learning results.
  • Use Learning Environment Modeling (LEM) to collaborate effectively with blended learning project teams and clients.
  • Facilitate more effective communication throughout the design process.
  • Use a learning environment design system and tool to remove or reduce ego-centric behaviors and attitudes during the design process. Join us to explore how LEM supports creative learning experience design and removes barriers to communication throughout the learning design process.

 

Cognition, Usability, and Design - The Psychology of Design and Use

Kirk St.Amant
3:45-4:35 PM | Celebration 5

Practitioner level audience

 

Usable objects create and contribute value to the related organization; non-usable ones do not. Technical communicators must therefore increasingly design materials to meet the usability expectations of different audiences. They can thus benefit from approaches that help them understand and address the usability expectations of different groups. This presentation introduces technical communicators – from the novice to the experienced – to cognitive psychology models that can facilitate the design of communication products to meet the usability expectations of different audiences.

 

Attendees will learn how to:

— Use these models to do research related to the usability expectations of different audiences

— Apply the related findings to create materials that meet the usability expectations of these audiences

— Convey such research and design ideas in ways that connect to and contribute to an organization’s core practices Through using such approaches to guide and discuss their work, technical communicators can more effectively reveal the ways in which they contribute value to their organizations.

 

Tuesday, 22 May

Lessons Learned: What Harry Potter Professors Teach Us About Instructional Design

Jamye Sagan
1:00-1:50 PM | Celebration 5

Foundation level audience

 

As technical communicators, we can help communicate the future by being ready to tackle any project we receive – even ones outside our realms of expertise. For instance, our clients and employers may ask us to help develop training materials and programs, even if we have never formally studied instructional design. Education plays a crucial role in the Harry Potter series by J.K. Rowling. At Hogwarts, the school where Harry Potter and his friends study magic, we witness several examples of instruction in action. Each of these professors – whether terrible or terrific –has important lessons to share with us regarding effective instructional design and training delivery.

In this presentation, we will profile various Hogwarts professors, and analyze the effectiveness of their lesson delivery. Within the lens of each professor profile, we will share practical tips on tackling common training issues, as well as provide some real-life (aka Muggle) training examples. By the end of the presentation, you will have the necessary tools to confidently tackle many basic training requests. Even if you have neither read the Harry Potter books nor watched the movies, you can still learn something from the Hogwarts professors.

 

Lights, Camera, Action! Exploring Video Basics for Non-Production Professionals

Darcy Beery & Stacy Barton
2:10-3:00 PM | Celebration 9-10

Practitioner level audience

 

Given the choice between finding the user manual or googling a short video on YouTube, many users would prefer to both hear and see the information being presented, especially younger generations who have been raised with technology. The basic concepts of video production need no longer be shrouded in the the mysterious aura of Hollywood as consumer technology has become both cost effective and highly professional. If you or your company have been toying with the idea of producing videos for clients or customers, but have fretted about the costs or effectiveness of this method, take heart it is now easier and more anticipated than ever before.

 

Teaching Technical Writing to Engineers - What Works?

Noel Atzmiller
4:00-4:50 PM | Celebration 5

Practitioner level audience

 

This session is intended for technical communicators who have been tasked with providing technical writing training to engineers (and other highly educated, technical individuals). Attendees receive information about 10 lessons learned that they can use when developing and leading their training sessions.

 

Wednesday, 23 May

Can You Hear Me Now? Podcasting as a Teaching Tool

Jennifer Goode
9:00-9:50 AM | Celebration 5

Practitioner level audience

 

Podcasting is one of the fastest growing areas of content production today. How can technical communication instructors capitalize on this rapidly expanding technology? This session will demonstrate how students can develop technical skills, increase content knowledge and understanding, and refine communication skills as they create podcasts for their course projects. It will also introduce the tools and technology necessary to set up your own course podcasting project. Finally, the session will share instructor and student reflections from a recent course that used podcasts as a major course project.

 

Events and presentations of interest

Sunday, 20 May

Leadership Program

8:00 AM-Noon | Celebration 5-6

The Leadership Program is hosted by STC’s Community Affairs Committee (CAC). It is designed to recognize innovative communities, provide STC community leaders with training in best practices for a successful community, and enable community leaders to network with their peers from across the country. The Community Achievement Award and Pacesetter Award winners will be announced at this session.

 

Welcome Reception and Expo Hall Open

5:00-6:30 PM | Windermere Ballroom

Attend the welcome reception in the expo hall and catch up with old friends, network, and meet exhibitors. There will also be a cake cutting ceremony in honor of the 65th anniversary.

 

Monday, 21 May

Opening General Session-Opening Keynote Speaker
Carla Johnson

9:00-10:15 AM | Windermere Ballroom

Carla is a popular speaker, author, storyteller, and Chief Experience Officer for Type A Communications. Her keynote address, “Perpetual Innovation,” will talk about how the world’s most innovative teams create great ideas to deliver exponential outcomes. Don’t miss her talk during the Opening General Session on Monday morning, 21 May, at 9:00 AM.

 

Pub Crawl Event Hosted by the Florida Chapter

Florida Chapter
7:30-10:30 PM
Orlando Restaurants

Come join us for a fun night of networking, relaxing, and socializing with other 2018 STC Summit attendees. …and what better way to do all that than with a “pub crawl”

We are currently finalizing our starting points, which are located in two major gathering points on International Drive: “Pointe Orlando” and “I-Drive 360,” home to the Orlando Eye.

Pointe Orlando is within walking distance of the hotel, while I-Drive 360 is a bit further away and can be reached by car (free parking available), Uber/Lyft/Lynx, or by riding the I-Drive Trolley, which runs until 10:30PM (2 tickets to the trolley are included for those staying at the host hotel).

Stay tuned for more information!! We will be posting the pub list soon, as well as instructions on what you need to do to attend. Please note that you must be a Summit attendee to attend this event.

If you are interested in knowing more about this event, please mark “Interested” to follow this event page and receive updates. The Florida Chapter looks forward to seeing you there! https://www.facebook.com/events/927923110709784/

 

Tuesday, 22 May

65th Anniversary Town Hall Meeting

Rhyne Armstrong & Julie Dwyer
10:10-11:00 AM | Celebration 1-2

It’s the Summit’s 65th anniversary, and what have we learned over the years? …Technology moves quickly, and whether we’re writing and designing for hardware and software—or robots and AI, we technical communicators are always expanding our knowledge and resources to prepare for the future.

As we prepare for the future of STC, join our town hall session to tell tales, ask questions, and discuss constructive ideas.

How can individual members contribute to the future of STC? What lessons learned do you think everyone should know? How can we innovate for the future? Whether you’re a new or seasoned member, don’t miss this opportunity to help shape the future of your organization.

 

Certified Professional Technical Communicator (CPTC) Q&A Session

Craig Baehr & Liz Pohland
2:10-3:00 PM | Celebration 1-2

Practitioner level audience

Join CEO Liz Pohland, Chief Examiner Craig Baehr, and CPTC trainers to talk about the program and your questions about becoming professionally certified. These experts will answer questions on everything including study strategies, resources, continuing education, and other aspects of the program.

 

Annual Business Meeting

5:30-6:30 PM | Windermere Ballroom

STC’s Annual Business Meeting will be held on Tuesday, 22 May, at 5:30 PM. Plan to attend to congratulate STC’s 2018-2019 Board of Directors and incoming STC President Jane Wilson. Click here to view the rules for the meeting.

 

Diner Meetup Hosted by the Florida Chapter

Florida Chapter
7:30-10:30 PM
Orlando Restaurants

What is a “diner meetup” you might ask?

It’s a fun event that lets you meet, socialize, and network with other 2018 STC Summit attendees in a relaxing environment while enjoying some amazing Orlando cuisine.

We are currently finalizing the list of participating restaurants, which are located in two major gathering points on International Drive: Pointe Orlando and I-Drive 360, home to the Orlando Eye.

Pointe Orlando is within walking distance of the hotel, while I-Drive 360 is a bit further away and can be reached by car (free parking available), Uber/Lynx, or by riding the I-Drive Trolley, which runs until 10:30PM (2 tickets to the trolley are included for those staying at the host hotel).

Stay tuned for more information!!! We will be posting the restaurant list soon, as well as instructions on what you need to do to attend. Please note that you must be a Summit attendee to attend this event.

If you are interested in knowing more about this event, please mark “Interested” to follow this event page and receive updates. The Florida Chapter looks forward to seeing you there! https://www.facebook.com/events/235244520352265/

Wednesday, 23 May

Honors Event - Keynote Speaker

Andy Hines
11:15 AM-1:00 PM | Windermere Ballroom

The Honors Event is the last event of the Summit and will be held Wednesday, 23 May, at 11:15 AM. Brunch will be served with this event and Andy Hines will wrap up what you learned about “the future of how we work, where we work, and you at work” at the Summit. Additionally, we’ll celebrate STC’s individual award winners, as well as the Most Improved Community and Community of the Year recipients.