First Friday Social Event

Join us on Friday, May 7, 2021 to initiate our First Friday social event for students and the Instructional Design & Learning (IDL) Special Interest Group (SIG) members. This event repeats on the first Friday of each month.  In May, join us for a short presentation on 5 advantages of being an IDL student member and stay to visit with IDL SIG members. Join the fun by registering on Facebook and Eventbrite. Tickets are limited, so register now.  

IDL SIG Receives Bronze Community Award

We are excited that we have received the Bronze Community Award for our community’s activities in 2020. The citation on the certificate reads:

For your impressive educational programming for your SIG and at the STC Summit, creative inclusion of students through your competition, and effective communication via your social media outlets and newsletter.

On Wednesday, 19 May, from 5:00 - 7:00 p.m. EDT., our community will be recognized during the 2021 STC Summit Leadership Program.

IDL SIG members can attend the virtual STC Summit Honors Event on Tuesday, 8 June, from noon to 1:00 p.m. EDT, where the Community of the Year and Most Improved Community will be announced. You can view the details for the 2021 STC Summit here.

STC IDL SIG Student Outreach Article-Writing Competition

The STC’s Instructional Design & Learning Special Interest Group (SIG) is pleased and proud to announce that the judges in the Student Outreach article-writing competition selected 2 articles for publication in this quarter’s issue of IDeaL: Design for Learning, the SIG’s award-winning newsletter. Both articles are very readable and informative.

Here are the two winners, with links to their articles:

Kylie is a Virginia Tech junior studying professional and technical writing and biology. Currently, she works as a research assistant for a study focused on the role of service-learning in creating user documentation. After graduation, Kylie plans to pursue a master’s degree in public health and write within the medical industry. Her article,  The Importance of Needs Assessments in Global Technical Communication, relates the story of a project targeting young women in Nepal. She outlines how she assessed the needs of her target audience for a user documentation prototype.

Catherine is completing her Master’s in Organizational Performance and Workplace Learning at Boise State University, where she earned her Workplace Instructional Design e-Learning Certification. She holds an ATD Certified Professional in Learning and Performance. Catherine graduated from Northeastern University with a Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering. She worked in various adult workplace learning roles for over 25 years, including IT, Project Management and Human Resources.

Her article, ID Lessons from TV’s Greatest Teachers, is about the original distance educators—from Reading Rainbow, the Joy of Painting, and Mr. Roger’s Neighborhood. She draws excellent strategies from her examples and presents tips for incorporating their successful techniques into your lesson planning.

Catherine will be presenting an IDL webinar on 4 TV personalities on Thursday, May 27. Follow STCIDLSIG on Facebook to learn more about our educational opportunities, which are always free for students. This event will be posted on Eventbrite once details are complete.

About the Student Outreach Article-Writing Competition

The IDL SIG invites undergraduate- and graduate-level students to submit an article related to instructional design for publication in our quarterly newsletter, IDeaL: Design for Learning. To learn more, click here.

Note From the Editor, Q1 2021

By Paul Scott, IDL SIG Newsletter Editor

CONTENTS

This quarter's issue is uncommonly large and high-quality, and almost all of it focuses on our student members. In fact, most of our issue is actually written by student members. Let this encourage more of you to write for us!

We lead with not one, but two featured articles, both by student members. Catherine Wecksell provides an excellent analysis of the instructional design of some of television's pioneering teachers: Fred Rogers, LeVar Burton, and Bob Ross. Then Kylie Call discusses the ins and outs of needs assessment in the context of a class assignment: designing an application with user documentation for an audience in Nepal. We follow this with Student Member Anne Matechuk, discussing how she works to benefit from her Student Membership.

Then we have articles from our officers. Jamye Sagan, our Treasurer, gives our quarterly financial report, as well as the results of her demographic survey of our membership. Membership Manager Lori Meyer assures us that there is still time to renew your membership for 2021, and our Webmaster Maralee Sautter then tells us about Lori's well-deserved Distinguished SIG Service Award (Lori was too modest to mention it herself).

This has been my favorite issue to edit so far. I hope all of you will continue to write this great content for us. See you in June!

FEATURED ARTICLE: The Original Remote Instructors: ID Lessons from TV’s Greatest Teachers

By Catherine Wecksell

With an increasing demand for online learning, instructional designers are adapting existing online instruction programs to create remote learning. TV legends like Fred Rogers, LeVar Burton, and Bob Ross provided effective distance learning before it became widespread. What techniques do these three TV hosts offer instructional designers for effective workplace learning today?

Fred Rogers was more present virtually than most people manage to be in person. 

Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood ran from 1968 to 2001, one of the longest-running children’s PBS series. Mr. Rogers spoke directly to children, validating their feelings and helping them name, face, and understand their emotions. Many have applied his methods to adult contexts such as leadership, HR, and pedagogy. 

Mr. Rogers engaged children with open-ended questions, asking them about their experiences and urging them to draw upon prior knowledge. He presented models and examples in "The Land of Make Believe,” encouraging children to connect these to their own experiences. Jack Mezirow established transformative learning theory in 1978, with the concept that the learner’s critical self-reflection can transform the learner’s perspective (Mezirow, 2009). Mezirow grounded his concept in the foundational theory of constructivismbased on the idea that people actively create their knowledge and understanding. Your reality is determined by your experiences as a learner.  Learner-centered instruction further acknowledges learners' differences, shifting the planning and control of learning from the instructor to the learner.

Mr. Rogers exemplified this principle, to the extent one can on TV. While the children couldn't direct the content on the episodes (the true learner-centered approach), his show included enough other content (such as visiting factories and interviewing guests) that the emotional instruction was an "offering" rather than a lesson to be imparted. Mr. Rogers’ gentle guidance and questioning put the learner at the center of the experience. He sang these words at the end of each episode: “I’ll be back, when the day is new, and I’ll have more ideas for you… You’ll have things you want to talk about… and I will, too.”

LeVar Burton helped a generation become self-directed learners.  

Actor LeVar Burton (Roots, Star Trek the Next Generation) hosted Reading Rainbow on PBS from 1983 to 2009. This beloved show encouraged a love of reading by exploring various topics related to a featured children’s book. Segments approached books from many directions, from character interviews and celebrity appearances to visiting the book's setting. Reading Rainbow earned over 200 broadcast awards, including a Peabody and 26 Emmy Awards. There are now interactive Reading Rainbow apps and video field trips for the iPad® and Kindle®.

LeVar taught around a subject, adding context by introducing related topics. Interdisciplinary learning combines learning objectives and methods from more than one branch of knowledge to focus on a central theme, issue, or problem. Interdisciplinary learning transfers knowledge gained in one discipline to another and deepens learning. 

Even with LeVar's acting skills, he didn't read or dramatize the book. Learners were encouraged to read the books themselves. Sometimes people misunderstand self-directed learning (SDL)—it is not about working alone. SDL means a learner sets and often measures their own learning goals and progress.  Another critical part of SDL includes sharing the learning process with peers and collaborating. LeVar would say, “But you don’t have to take my word for it…” Children would then come on screen and make book recommendations to each other.

Bob Ross taught skills one happy cloud at a time.

Bob Ross hosted The Joy of Painting, another PBS television show that aired from 1983 to 1994. Bob Ross demonstrated with each brushstroke how to paint landscapes in oil. Many enjoyed watching him demonstrate specific landscape painting techniques by showing how to create integral elements, such as the sky, trees, and “happy clouds.”

Observational learning is a subset of social learning theory and describes learning from watching and mimicking others' behaviors. Techniques of observational learning include modeling, shaping, and chaining. Observational learning is most common with children as they tend to copy adults naturally. However, on-the-job skills are also learned via observational learning.

People often develop new skills by shadowing. An example of this is having a new hire observe a more experienced employee on the job. Video tutorials and recorded screen captures are also observational learning. 

Bob Ross’s consistency and demonstration of skills set his instruction apart. His impeccable planning of the show achieved this consistency. Bob planned each word and made three copies of his paintings for each show. Careful planning, prepping, and storyboarding are also vital to quality workplace learning and facilitation excellence.

Employ Learner-Centered techniques as Mr. Rogers did:

  • Build open-ended questions into the learning experience.
  • Have the learner draw upon their own experience and construct their own meaning.
  • Allow the learner to direct and take ownership of what is learned.

Encourage Self-Directed and Social Learning the same way as LeVar Burton:

  • Encourage independent exploration of content by providing ample resources and materials.
  • Build peer collaboration with discussion boards and communities of practices.
  • Use an interdisciplinary approach to teach many job functions around a single example.

Create consistent Observational Learning in the same way Bob Ross did:

  • Include demonstrations or simulations. 
  • Provide guides to support workplace shadowing.
  • Prototype your learning assets.

Mr. Rogers’ listening and empathy were profound, allowing children to feel acknowledged without even being in the same room. LeVar Burton stimulated self-directed and social learning. Bob Ross led learners through excellence in observational learning. They engaged learners without being able to see or get feedback from them. You can use the same learner-centered, self-directed, social, and observational approaches employed by these famous TV educators to engage remote workplace learners today.

REFERENCES

Mezirow, Jack (2009). An overview on transformative learning. In Knud Illeris (ed.), Contemporary Theories of Learning: Learning Theorists -- In Their Own Words. Routledge.

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

Photos of Fred Rogers and LeVar Burton were obtained from Wikimedia commons, who provide the sourcing and copyright information for them at the following links:

https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:LeVar_Burton_July_2017.jpg

https://simple.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fred_Rogers#/media/File:Fred_Rogers_and_Neighborhood_Trolley.jpg

®Bob Ross name and images are registered trademarks of Bob Ross Inc. © Bob Ross Inc. Used with permission.